Art, Food & Wine – Taos, New Mexico Traditions

Wine Seminar- Pairing Wine with Food - Jo Ann Carolla-Polt ©John Lamkin

Wine Seminar- Pairing Wine with Food - Jo Ann Carolla-Polt ©John Lamkin

It may come as a surprise to learn that the first wine production in the United States started in what now is called New Mexico by Spanish monks in 1633. The New Mexico wine country is home to over forty wineries, several in the vicinity of the art colony, Taos, high up in the Sangre de Cristo mountains.

In August, 2011 the toast of taos arts & wine festival took place under the new and enthusiastic management of Jan Mellor, gallery owner; Jillian Smothers, Food & Beverage Director for Taos Country Club; and sculptor Steven Gootgeld. This year the festival consisted of three main events. Several art, food and music partnering events ran concurrent with the festival.

Continue reading on Examiner.com Art, Food & Wine – Taos, New Mexico Traditions – Albuquerque Travel

Tomorrow (10/15/2010) is the last chance to Win a $10,000 Trip to Chile Wine Regions – HURRY

The Wine Regions of Chile 

You still have still have until October 15 (quickly!) to enter a contest sponsored by wines of Chile. The winner will receive a $10,000 dream vacation for two in Chile’s wine regions. All you have to do is draw up an itinerary for your trip and explain how you will use Twitter to promote these regions. Find the details here: tweet.winesofchile.org

Autumn in New Mexico & Trapiche Wines

Trapiche Wines from Mendoza, Argentina [photo: ©John Lamkin]

Trapiche Wines from Mendoza, Argentina -photo: ©John Lamkin

The autumn leaves sang with color. The brisk air quickened our step as we walked down the tree-lined dirt road to our Northern New Mexico home.

The tree limbs bowed with the weight of the fruit, apples, plums and pears—a very bountiful year.

The warmth of the house was augmented by the aroma of the apple pie in the oven.

Warm apple pie and Trapiche Oak Cask Chardonnay 2007. This is living!

Trapiche Oak Cask Chardonney

Trapiche Oak Cask Char- donney

The color of the wine mirrored the quaking aspens outside.  The aroma was predominately…guess what…apple pie, pear and a touch buttery oak (aged nine months in oak barrels). A crisp, sweet, round wine, with good acidity and a lingering grape finish.

chef17

José Andrés

Celebrity Spanish Chef, José Andrés, pairs Trapiche Oak Cask Chardonnay with gazpacho soup with lobster.

I also tried Trapiche Malbec 2007, a rich red wine with violet hues with a taste of berries, plums and cherries, round in the mouth with just a touch of truffle & vanilla.

The Trapiche wines are a real bargain—great wines for a small price. Wine guru, Natalie MacLean has included them in her “Good Values Wine Picks” reviews.

The Trapiche Winery started in 1883 in the region of Mendoza, Argentina, at the foothills of the Andes Mountains (where “the condor soars”). Trapiche was the first winery in Argentina to import and use French and American oak barrels and the first winery in Argentina to export wine.

www.trapiche.com.ar
www.frederickwildman.com

Wine, Good Friends, Perks & Scholarships

Ponte Wines

Ponte Wines

The storm clouds were gathering and an icy wind ripped across the mesa. We hurried from the car and into the wood-stove warm comfort of Ken and Madonna’s house.

The aroma of the spiced chicken sizzling on the patio grill wafted into the house and the Ponte Chardonnay 2008 we brought was just the right temperature.

We sat down with good friends to enjoy this sumptuous meal of spiced chicken, freshly harvested squash and a farmers’ market green salad with piñon nuts.

The Ponte Chardonnay 2008* was an excellent match to this wonderful meal and added a warm glow to the whole ambiance.

*A smooth, full-bodied Chardonnay—fruity with flavor notes of green apple, coconut and a hint of vanilla (it’s aged in oak barrels), and has a slightly buttery finish. Read more…

Refreshen Your Wine Knowledge—for Free!

Refreshen Your Wine Knowledge—for Free!Take Your First Sip of the CIA*… online!Deepen your wine knowledge from the convenience of your home or business through a CIA Web-based course. The tuition-free “A Taste of Wine Online” offers the perfect introduction to the Professional Wine Studies experience featuring an outstanding faculty of wine experts, in-depth examinations of wine, and guided tastings. If you have an interest in learning more about the world of wine, you’ll enjoy our online wine class. *Culinary Institute of America Click here to login and begin the online wine course!A Taste of Wine OnlineCIA Free Discovery CoursesIn this virtual short course, you’ll take a close look at three of the world’s classic wine grape varietals. You’ll get answers to some fundamental wine questions direct from vintners and growers. You’ll read about the principles of wine and food pairing and learn what leading restaurateurs are recommending these days with cabernet sauvignon, sauvignon blanc and syrah. Your guides for this taste exploration are four of the country’s top wine teachers, each a distinguished member of the Greystone wine faculty. They will walk you through structured wine tastings and share their approach to understanding these popular varietals. Finally, a quiz will test what you’ve learned. Complete the course and you’ll learn: • How to identify tannin in cabernet sauvignon, and what role it plays • What flavors characterize syrah from different parts of the world • How to distinguish a barrel-fermented from a stainless steel-fermented sauvignon blanc • How to make appropriate food choices for each of these varietals. Objective: Learn about three of the world’s classic wine grape varietals: cabernet sauvignon, sauvignon blanc and syrah. Thanks to the Culinary Institute of America.Refreshen Your Wine Knowledge—for Free!

Take Your First Sip of the CIA*… online!

Deepen your wine knowledge from the convenience of your home or business through a CIA Web-based course. The tuition-free “A Taste of Wine Online” offers the perfect introduction to the Professional Wine Studies experience featuring an outstanding faculty of wine experts, in-depth examinations of wine, and guided tastings. If you have an interest in learning more about the world of wine, you’ll enjoy our online wine class.

*Culinary Institute of America

Click here to login and begin the online wine course!

A Taste of Wine Online
CIA Free Discovery Courses

In this virtual short course, you’ll take a close look at three of the world’s classic wine grape varietals. You’ll get answers to some fundamental wine questions direct from vintners and growers. You’ll read about the principles of wine and food pairing and learn what leading restaurateurs are recommending these days with cabernet sauvignon, sauvignon blanc and syrah. Your guides for this taste exploration are four of the country’s top wine teachers, each a distinguished member of the Greystone wine faculty. They will walk you through structured wine tastings and share their approach to understanding these popular varietals. Finally, a quiz will test what you’ve learned. Complete the course and you’ll learn: • How to identify tannin in cabernet sauvignon, and what role it plays • What flavors characterize syrah from different parts of the world • How to distinguish a barrel-fermented from a stainless steel-fermented sauvignon blanc • How to make appropriate food choices for each of these varietals. Objective: Learn about three of the world’s classic wine grape varietals: cabernet sauvignon, sauvignon blanc and syrah.

Thanks to the Culinary Institute of America.

Mision Wine from Cerocahui, Mexico

Mision Wine from Cerocahui, Mexico. See story

Mision Rojo Wine from Mision Winery, Cerocahui, Mexico

Cerocahui, Mexico: Tarahumara Indians, Jesuits and Wine
Story and photos by John Lamkin

Bumping along 45 minutes of dirt road from the train station, through the wooded landscape, the forest opens to reveal the alpine-like valley of Cerocahui (sero-kah-wee), a mile-high paradise. Below, I catch a glimpse of the hidden valley with its silver river winding through its vineyards and apple orchards — I could have been somewhere in Southern Europe, but I am actually near the edge of the Barrancas de Cobre(Copper Canyon), Mexico’s Grand Canyon. Little did I expect to find ancient vineyards here on top of the world.. Read the story on Global Writes