Art, Food & Wine – Taos, New Mexico Traditions

Wine Seminar- Pairing Wine with Food - Jo Ann Carolla-Polt ©John Lamkin

Wine Seminar- Pairing Wine with Food - Jo Ann Carolla-Polt ©John Lamkin

It may come as a surprise to learn that the first wine production in the United States started in what now is called New Mexico by Spanish monks in 1633. The New Mexico wine country is home to over forty wineries, several in the vicinity of the art colony, Taos, high up in the Sangre de Cristo mountains.

In August, 2011 the toast of taos arts & wine festival took place under the new and enthusiastic management of Jan Mellor, gallery owner; Jillian Smothers, Food & Beverage Director for Taos Country Club; and sculptor Steven Gootgeld. This year the festival consisted of three main events. Several art, food and music partnering events ran concurrent with the festival.

Continue reading on Examiner.com Art, Food & Wine – Taos, New Mexico Traditions – Albuquerque Travel

New Mexico Magazine Unveils First-Ever ‘Best Eats’ Edition‏

May 5, 2010

New Mexico Magazine Unveils First-Ever ‘Best Eats’ Edition

New Mexico Magazine unveils 16 quintessential New Mexican dishes and the restaurants where you can order them in the June 2010 issue, reaching subscribers now.

Writers of the “Best Eats” cover story are Gil Garduño of Gil’s Thrilling (and Filling) Blog; Santa Fe School of Cooking culinary director (and frequent “Southwest Flavor” contributor) Rocky Durham; and the queen of travels off the beaten path, Lesley S. King (who writes the monthly department “King of the Road”). The trio literally—and figuratively—came to the table to hash out their favorites in eight categories, with a “down-home” and “uptown” selection for each. Prices range from $2.25 to $25.

“Nothing says New Mexico likes its distinctive cuisine,” said Michael Cerletti, Secretary of the New Mexico Tourism Department. “The winning restaurants are to be congratulated for their expertise. New Mexico Magazine has once again given us an excellent opportunity to educate the world on what New Mexico cuisine has to offer.”

“Food is a unique part of the New Mexico experience and the New Mexico travel experience,” added Editor-in-chief Tricia Ware. “Our state has a culture all its own and a cuisine all its own to reflect that. Even with a total of 16 favorites and new things to try in this issue, it’s not nearly enough, and I’m sure readers will respond with suggestions of their own.”

This year’s picks are:

  1. Best Burger: Down-home: Buckhorn Burger, Buckhorn Tavern, San Antonio, $6; and Uptown: The Daily Grind, Rio Chama restaurant, Santa Fe, $10.
  2. Best Huevos Rancheros: Down-home: Huevos Rancheros, El Camino Dining Room, Albuquerque, $7.95; and Uptown: the Taoseño, Gutiz, El Prado, $9.
  3. Best Deli Sandwich: Down-home: Hot Pastrami on Rye, Back Street Bistro, Santa Fe, $8.50; and Uptown: Southwest Spin, Lula’s, Taos, $8.80.
  4. Best Comfort Food: Down-home: Sopaipilla Compuesta, Nellie’s Café, Las Cruces, $7.50; and Uptown: Zia’s Famous Organic Meatloaf, Zia Diner, Santa Fe, $12.
  5. Best Taco: Down-home: Pollo con Guacamole Taco, El Parasol, Española, $2.25 each; and Uptown: Filet Mignon Tacos, The Roasted Clove, Angel Fire, $12.95 for four-to-six.
  6. Best Green Chile Stew: Down-home: Bowl of Green Chile with Tortilla, Duran’s Central Pharmacy, Albuquerque, $6.40; and Uptown: Green Chile Bison Stew, Sugar Nymphs Bistro, Peñasco, $9.95.
  7. Best Dessert: Down-home: Chocolate Cream Pie, Pie-O-Neer Café, Pie Town, $4.95; and Uptown: Chocolate Red Chile Soup, La Casa Sena, Santa Fe, $9.
  8. Best Local, Seasonal Ingredients: Down-home: Farmers Salad, The Grove, Albuquerque, $9.95; and Uptown: Candied Pork Belly Blue Corn Taco, Café at the Kumquat, Silver City, $25 for three-course meal.

New Mexico Magazine’s “Best Eats” issue is a collaborative effort and owes its success to associate editor Ashley M. Biggers; writers Gil Garduño, Rocky Durham, and Lesley S. King; “Best Eats” photographer Douglas Merriam; art director Fabian West; cover photographer Karen Kuehn; and cover model Ashley Bryce. Cover photo location is Duran’s Central Pharmacy in Albuquerque.

New Mexico Magazine, founded in 1922, is a division of the New Mexico Tourism Department. It was the nation’s first state magazine and is third-largest by circulation. The June issue also reveals the winner of the first-ever New Mexico Magazine Salsa Contest.

For more information about New Mexico Magazine, call 505-827-7447, fax 505-827- 6496, or visit http://www.nmmagazine.com

Mike Stauffer

Communications Director

New Mexico Tourism Department

505-827-7379

IFWTWA Culinary Division Advisory Board Chef, Gordon Ramsay, Interviewed by the Telegraph in UK

Chef Gordon Ramsay

Chef Gordon Ramsay - courtesy of IFWTWA

Welcome, reader, to Gordon Ramsay’s fabulously appointed family home, overlooking one of south west London’s most beautiful parks.
But before we get to the front door, we must first bypass the gates, the CCTV cameras and the expensive array of cars in the driveway. One half expects there to be security guards, too – though obviously there are staff.
The door is opened by one of two PR ladies who will today be listening in on our interview with the fiery chef. There is also a dog-walker, a gardener and a man attending to a malfunctioning dishwasher in the magnificently large kitchen (one of two).

Welcome, reader, to Gordon Ramsay’s fabulously appointed family home, overlooking one of south west London’s most beautiful parks.
But before we get to the front door, we must first bypass the gates, the CCTV cameras and the expensive array of cars in the driveway. One half expects there to be security guards, too – though obviously there are staff.
The door is opened by one of two PR ladies who will today be listening in on our interview with the fiery chef. There is also a dog-walker, a gardener and a man attending to a malfunctioning dishwasher in the magnificently large kitchen (one of two). Read more at the Telegraph.

Read more about Chef Gordon Ramsay at the International Food Wine & Travel Writers Association’s online magazine, Global Writes.

 

Two Recipes Compliments of Australia’s Chef Susanita

Susanne Wilder (AKA Chef Sunanita)

Susanne Wilder (AKA Chef Susanita)

Australian* Chef Susanita (AKA Susanne Wilder) shares these two winter warm-up recipes with us:

* A U.S. expatriate trying to teach the Aussies how to eat right.

Susanita’s Salsas

Chile con Queso

This classic favourite is easy to make ahead and can be prepared in a low fat manner. Many think of this as Tex-Mex, but it is also served in Chihuahua, Mexico, as an appetizer with tortillas and even as a vegetable side dish with broiled meats. Bake corn tortilla wedges (use a variety of colours) in an 180C oven for 10 minutes for a fat-free crunch!  Think of other ways to serve,

Spray or 1 tsp (5g) organic butter

1 medium red onion, sliced

2 cloves purple local garlic, minced

1 8oz can (227g) organic diced tomatoes

3-4 assorted chiles, roasted, peeled and cut into strips without removing seeds

1 Tsp (15g) minced fresh oregano

Salt & fresh grnd pepper to taste

1 pkg. 8 oz (227g) Neufchatel cream cheese, softened or a mix of goat’s cheese – to taste

1 bag corn tortilla chips (Chef Susanita makes her own from fresh corn tortillas)

3-4 whole Kalamata olives

In a medium saucepan or large wok for a crowd, over medium-high heat, melt butter and sauté onion and garlic until tender. Stir in tomatoes, chiles, oregano, salt and pepper. Simmer for 10 minutes; stir often. Reduce heat. Add cream cheese and continue to heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Garnish with olives. Serve each other on baked tortilla chips or crudités – cut fresh organic vegetables.

SPICY TOMATO S.W. SIPPING SOUP

Serves 8

This simple fast soup was first developed as a Holiday season sipping soup for Sunset Magazine in 1975. It re-appeared (with 3 major changes) in my 4th cookbook, Entertaining Fast & Fresh and with a Southwest flair most recently in Creative Mexican Cooking. Serve from heated tureen. Looks a lovely blood red!

Oil from pump spray (1 tsp=2 squirts)

1 large red onion, minced

2 cans  (400 gm Ea.) 1/2 lb Roma tomatoes, crushed

1 cup real chicken broth

1 med. orange, zested (opt.)

1 tsp. paprika

1 Tbsp. Freshly grated ginger

2 tsp. candied diced ginger

1 tbsp. chiffonnade of fresh basil leaves

½ – 1 small bay leaf (or lemon myrtle leaf)

¼ tsp. Each freshly grated nutmeg, cloves & allspice

¼ cup minced parsley

Garnish:

Lemon or lime slices

Fat-free sour cream

Haas avocado, diced

TO PREP:

Prepare and measure all ingredients.

TO COOK:

Spray and heat large non stick pot or Dutch oven. Add onion; cover and cook on medium low until translucent (“sweat”), about 6 to 8 minutes. Add remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer 15 minutes. Remove from heat & discard bay leaf.

TO SERVE:

Just before serving stir in parsley. Garnish each serving with citrus slice, dollop of cream and a jaunty fillip of ginger with diced avocado.


Susanne E. Wilder
, CFE, Dip Ed, Cert. IV is a Home Economist (Washington State University), Reformed Cordon Bleu chef, nutrition consultant, food stylist for print and film, writer, author of 7 cookbooks, culinary consultant in the food industry, and instructor/trainer with three decades of experience in the foodservice and consumer food segments as well as a media spokesperson for wellness and lifestyle. Avocationally, Susanne is also a Hatha Yoga instructor, and a roller-blading, biking, kayaking, and fishing bon vivant! Currently she is working on new formulas and PR for various organic and healthy Australian food clients as well as writing a play and murder food mystery series. www.fstnfrsh.com

fstnfrsh.com

Fast & Fresh Cuisine, one of Susanne's Websites

Susanne Wilder is also The International Food Wine and Travel Writers Association’s (IFWTWA) Regional Membership Director for Western Australia and Indonisia.

To read Susanne Wilder’s food philosophy click here.

Red Willow Farmers Market, Taos Indian (Tewa) Pueblo, New Mexico

Taos Indian (Tewa) Pueblo, Northern New Mexico

Taos Indian (Tewa) Pueblo, Northern New Mexico - photo: ©John Lamkin

At the edge of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, in Northern New Mexico, lies Taos Indian (Tewa) Pueblo, beneath Taos Mountain (sacred to the Tewa).

Every summer the Pueblo people bring their produce, baked goods and other delectables to the Red Willow Farmers Market at the southern end of the Pueblo.

In addition to the fine food one often experiences the traditional drumming and singing at Red Willow. Read More